UK weather latest: Brits to bask in 34C sunshine as heatwave hits

Britain could be basking in the hottest day of the year so far next week as temperatures of up to 34C arrive. Met Office meteorologists expect the weather to gradually improve day-by-day, before reaching a high in the latter part of the week. It comes as the Government has begun easing lockdown restrictions, including allowing groups of up to six people to meet outside, meaning Brits will be able to enjoy the sunshine in the park or beach with friends.

Met Office meteorologist Matty Box told Express.co.uk that tomorrow, Monday, June 22, will be widely sunny for the whole country.

In terms of next week, Mr Box said: “We are developing temperatures through Monday and Tuesday with a bit of a north-west south-east split, and it will be quite widely sunny across much of Wales and eastern England.

“Temperatures will be starting to increase and it’s going to turn hot throughout this week, maximum temperatures will be between 20-29C in the south-east on Tuesday.

“Temperatures are going to build up through Wednesday and Thursday, and temperatures could reach 33-34C on Thursday, June 25.”

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Mr Box added: “Somewhere in south-east England, East Anglia and East Midlands are areas where we will see the hottest temperatures, and it’s going to be, quite widely, a hot day with some warm sunshine.”

Explaining the forecast for next weekend, Mr Box said that it is likely to return to an unsettled and unpredictable nature.

“There is quite a bit of uncertainty as we head towards the end of the working week, by the time you get to Thursday there is a chance that a north-westerly front could act as a focus for some thunder showers across parts of Scotland and northern England,” he said.

“When you get to Friday, it looks like we could see the start of a breakdown of the warm weather, there is a chance that there will be some showers affecting parts of eastern England.

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“We might see something a bit windier and a bit wetter start to push into western parts of the United Kingdom on Friday afternoon, but there is still a reasonable amount of certainty.”

Britain is expected to beat its hottest day of the year, which was recorded at 28.2C at Santon Downham on Wednesday, May 20.

Ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond from Weathertrending said: “Midsummer heat and the hottest spell of the year so far is forecast, thanks to southerly winds and air from sub-tropical latitudes.

“Most will have fine and warm weather, with heat peaking from midweek onwards.”

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The Weather Outlook forecaster Brian Gaze added: “June has been flaming wet – but will switch to flaming hot.”

Further on, the Met Office weather forecast from June 30 to July 14 predicts a risk of showers.

Long-range forecasts show that temperatures will mainly stay in the mid-20s, but some areas of the southeast of England will see highs of up to 30C.

The showers could turn heavy and possibly thundery across parts of the south, but Britain should also see some drier and brighter interludes.

The forecast reads: “Temperatures should generally be above average, possibly turning very warm in places.

“In early July, a transition to more settled conditions is signalled with many seeing more prolonged drier and sunnier spells.”

The sunny weather comes as the British Government has begun easing some lockdown restrictions in place.

From June 15, all non-essential retailers including clothing and craft outlets were allowed to reopen for the first time in almost three months.

Additionally, some people have started returning to work and campsites and caravan parks are expected to reopen for holidaymakers on July 4 onwards – bringing a slow, but steady return to normality.

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