Elderly worker at farm for therapy animals rammed to death by ‘comfort sheep’

A pensioner was rammed to death by a "comfort sheep" while she was volunteering at a therapy farm in Massachusetts on the weekend.

Kim Taylor, 73, was feeding the sheep when one of the animals suddenly charged at her while she was in the pen alone in Bolton on Saturday.

The grandmother was left suffering from serious injuries and went into cardiac arrest shortly after paramedics arrived at around 9 am.

She was rushed to hospital but despite medics efforts she was tragically pronounced dead, reports the Daily Mail.

The retired nurse volunteered weekly at the site and had been helping out for over a year.

Meghan Moran, the director of Cultivate Care Farms said: "Kim was beloved by all who worked with her during the 14 months she volunteered at the farm."

Her devastated daughters Candice and Samantha Denby said their mum was an "animal lover" who looked forward to her volunteering sessions.

They said: "Our mother, Kim Taylor, was not only a great mother, grandmother and friend but was also a huge animal lover.

"She found joy in her weekly volunteering at Cultivate Care Farms in Bolton, MA. This accident was tragic and we are so very sad.

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"She was an avid knitter, cook and Red Sox fan. She greeted others while walking her dogs and always found joy on these outdoor walks."

Bolton police Chief Warren Nelson confirmed that there were no witnesses "when a sheep charged at her and repeatedly rammed her."

Cultivate Farms say they are a pioneer of therapy for children and adolescents using animals. They aim to establish their work as a form of treatment and to be ranked on the same level as cognitive behaviour therapy.

It has been reported that animal control and staff at the farm are considering "the future outcome of the sheep."

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