Afghanistan crisis: Economy ‘brought to its knees’ as food may run out within a month

Afghanistan food crisis rising as supplies run low

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Ramiz Alakbarov, the UN’s humanitarian chief in Afghanistan, has said about a third of Afghanistan’s population, 38 million people, don’t know if they will have food every day. In recent weeks the UN’s World Food Programme distributed food across the country, but current reports show shortages are expected.

With winter approaching and a drought ongoing in the country, officials warn the nation will need at least $200 million to feed the nation.

Previously, UN officials said that $1.3 billion will be needed for overall aid efforts in the country.

Only 39 percent has been received.

“By the end of September, the stocks which the World Food Program has in the country will be out,” Mr Alakbarov told reporters at a virtual news conference.

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“We will not be able to provide those essential food items because we’ll be out of stocks.”

As food runs low, the remaining produce has spiked in prices.

“If the situation continues like this and there is no government to control the prices, that will cause so many problems for local people,” Mohammad Sharif, a shopkeeper in the capital of Kabul, told ABC News.

There have been reports of long queues outside of banks as cash reserves run short.

Afghans in Kabul have been attempting to get their money in cash, news agencies reported last week, as the economic collapse looms.

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In a blog post, two associate fellows from an international affairs think tank in London said the economy is “brought to its knees”.

“The Afghan economy is being brought to its knees by the closure of banks and offices receiving remittances, a collapse in the value of the currency, shortages of food and fuel in the cities, price inflation, the disruption of trade, and the inability to pay wages,” Mark Bowden and Martin Barber, associate fellows at Chatham House wrote in the blog.

Prices have been soaring in the bazaars in the capital of Kabul as the economy is expected to collapse in weeks, officials have said.

Hans-Jakob Schindler, a German former diplomat, told NBC the economic collapse may come in weeks or a couple of months.

He said: “Then the economy is in deep trouble.”

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