Brexit Britain announces last-minute decision to protect EU citizens wanting to stay in UK

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Announcing the decision on Friday, the Home Office announced late applicants to the EU Settlement Scheme will now be given temporary protection for themselves and their families. Temporary protection will now be provided for three months in order to assess late applications and appeals. Citizens from the EU, Norway, Lichtenstein, Iceland, Switzerland and their families living in the UK had until June 30 to apply for the scheme which guarantees their right to live, work and access public services in Britain.

Kevin Foster minister for future border and immigration claimed the Government had worked hard to ensure the majority had been approved.

He said: “Every day thousands of people are being given status through the hugely successful EU Settlement Scheme.

“We’ve worked hard to ensure the vast majority applied before the 30 June deadline and are now supporting those making late applications.

“Granting temporary protection to those who apply late to the scheme, and to joining family members, demonstrates our continued support to ensure everybody eligible is granted the status they deserve.”

The Government has informed the EU Commission of its decision and will work to inform applicants to provide further information.

Over six million applications were made to the scheme before the June 30 deadline.

There have also been 5.1 million grants of status while the Home Office insists only a small number had missed the deadline.

Following the end of the transition period, EU, European Economic Area and Swiss citizens had to show evidence of their right to be in the UK through their immigration status.

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The Government also announced a decision on the European work visas for musicians and artists travelling in the EU this week. 

After criticism from musicians over the lack of provisions provided for touring on the continent, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport announced the results of negotiations with 19 countries.

Following the negotiations, musicians will not need short-term visas or work permits for short-term tours.

These countries are: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, and Sweden.

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A Government statement read: “We want to ensure that when Covid-19 restrictions are lifted, touring can resume and our world-leading creative and cultural artists can continue to travel widely, learning their craft, growing their audiences and showing the best of British creativity to the world.

“We want the UK’s fantastic performers and other creative professionals to be able to tour abroad easily.

“We recognise challenges remain around touring, and we are continuing to work closely with the industry.

“We want to ensure that when COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, touring can resume and our world-leading creative and cultural artists can continue to travel widely, learning their craft, growing their audiences and showing the best of British creativity to the world.”

Musicians such as Sir Elton John had previously criticised the lack of provisions.

Following the announcement, David Martin, the chief executive of the Featured Artists Coalition, said it had changed nothing.

He said: “We knew all this in January.

“The idea that the government has done something fantastic or that it has won some concessions is not correct.

“The announcement is not new information to the music industry.”

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