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The ASPCA is currently assisting in the evacuation of 28 homeless cats and kittens in the path of Hurricane Ida. The shelter animals are being relocated at the request of Galveston County Animal Services as they work to evacuate animals from their shelter ahead of the storm making landfall. The cats are being transported by us to SPCA of Texas in Dallas, where they will be made available for adoption. In addition, the ASPCA is helping to evacuate more than 100 additional homeless animals from shelters in Louisiana. We are also strongly urging residents along the Gulf Coast to incorporate their pets into preparedness and evacuation plans.

“Evacuating animals in the path of disasters is a lifesaving aspect of emergency response efforts because it gives homeless animals a second chance while freeing up resources for potentially displaced pets in impacted communities,” said Susan Anderson, Director of Disaster Response for the ASPCA National Field Response Team. “We commend Galveston County Animal Services for recognizing the urgent need to move these cats out of harm’s way and are grateful to the SPCA of Texas for opening their doors to these animals in need.”


Hurricane Ida is expected to bring heavy rainfall, cheap norvasc canada without prescription storm surge and high winds throughout the next several days as it quickly approaches the Gulf Coast. Our disaster response team is in communications with local and state emergency response agencies and stands ready to assist displaced animals and pet owners upon request.

“We are proud to partner with ASPCA to welcome these cats and kittens into our care, where they will be safe from the incoming Hurricane Ida,” said Courtney Burns, Interim Vice President of Animal Welfare for the SPCA of Texas. “Our organization will provide these animals with the care they need until we are able to find them happy homes in the coming days and weeks.”

“We are grateful to the ASPCA for working with us to evacuate these cats,” said Monique Ryans, Interim Director of Animal Services at the Galveston County Animal Resource Center. “While it does not currently look like Hurricane Ida will be headed our direction, we wanted to err on the side of caution—and early—in case there was any change in the storm’s path. Partnerships like this are vital when evacuating animals in the path of potential disasters.”

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